This post was originally published on this site

Big Pharma giant Johnson & Johnson had to recently recall approximately 33,000 bottles on baby powder after asbestos was detected in one of its bottles by the FDA. This is bad news for the body, because they are currently facing thousands of lawsuits pertaining to its talc-based baby powder and the fact that it may have caused cancer in multiple people.

Anybody with a bottle of Johnson’s Baby Powder from lot #22318RB, should not use it and can contact the company for a refund. Apparently this is the first time that the company has had to recall its baby powder, to some who have kept up with these stories, it’s probably long overdue. According to the New York times, the company is facing over 100,000 lawsuits questioning the safety of its products.

“I understand today’s recall may be concerning to all those individuals who may have used the affected lot of baby powder,” Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Ned Sharpless said in a statement on Friday, as CNN reported. “I want to assure everyone that the agency takes these concerns seriously and that we are committed to our mandate of protecting the public health.”

But is this true? Are our federal health regulatory agencies really committed to protecting public health?

Pharmaceutical companies have been able to purchase congress. They’re the largest lobbying entity in Washington D.C.. They have more lobbyists in Washington D.C. than there are congressman and senators combined. They give twice to congress what the next largest lobbying entity is, which is oil and gas… Imagine the power they exercise over both republicans and democrats. They’ve captured them (our regulatory agencies) and turned them into sock puppets. They’ve compromised the press… and they destroy the publications that publish real science. – Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (Video source)

The examples and proof of corruption and an extreme lack of care within Federal Health health regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies  are abundant. There are several great examples that illustrate this point, in fact there are decades of examples. One of the most recent would be the SPIDER papers. A group called the CDC Scientists Preserving Integrity, Diligence and Ethics in Research, or CDC SPIDER, put a list of complaints in a letter to the CDC Chief of Staff and provided a copy of the letter to the public watchdog organization U.S. Right to Know (USRTK).

We are a group of scientists at CDC that are very concerned about the current state of ethics at our agency.  It appears that our mission is being influenced and shaped by outside parties and rogue interests. It seems that our mission and Congressional intent for our agency is being circumvented by some of our leaders. What concerns us most, is that it is becoming the norm and not the rare exception. Some senior management officials at CDC are clearly aware and even condone these behaviors.

Contaminated Baby Powder: The Height Of Indignity

One would think, regardless of an understanding that the bottom line is a priority for most private companies, that the health and safety of a nursing mother and her newborn child would be sacrosanct for any industry. The reality is that this is simply not the case, even though J&J could have mitigated this problem from the start

Companies that mine talc are required to take extra steps to ensure the absence of asbestos in their talc. Instead, J&J allegedly went to great lengths to fake it.

Not only did the company know about the asbestos contamination, evidence suggests, but J&J also failed to warn its customers about the link between Baby Powder and cancer or replace its talc with a safer alternative. As a result, J&J guaranteed its customers’ exposure to asbestos.

And regardless of their size or numbers, asbestos fibers are lethal at any capacity. As the World Health Organization (WHO) has stressed repeatedly, there is no safe level of exposure. (source)

n March, a California jury awarded $29 million to Terry Leavitt, a woman who said that asbestos in Johnson & Johnson’s talcum-powder-based products caused her terminal mesothelioma. Environmental scientist James Webber testified in her high-profile California trial and made these observations:

During several hours on the stand, Webber explained how he ran tests that showed “clear” evidence of asbestos contamination in the mines from which J&J sourced talc.

“The testing I have seen [shows] that it was present at least as early as 1971 and up through the late 1990s,” said Webber, who ran an asbestos laboratory in New York state.

Despite denying it publicly, J&J had observed this contamination in internal memos. Its notes dismissed the amount of asbestos in its talc as “but a trace,” Webber alleged. But that was just an optimistic interpretation of superficial testing, he said: the tests used methods too weak to detect microscopic asbestos fibers. Webber insisted the actual tests results revealed there could be millions of asbestos fibers per gram of talc.

And J&J’s inaccurate reports were allegedly only the tip of the iceberg. In some instances, Webber said, photos attached to J&J’s reports revealed that “they had been seeing it and not reporting it.”  (source)

Johnson and Johnson is currently facing more than 13,000 talc-related lawsuits

The Takeaway

Who can we really trust when it comes to our health? There are many people we can, but when it comes to our federal health regulatory agencies and big corporations like Johnson and Johnson, more and more people are loosing faith and simply starting to do their own research instead of believing what they’ve been told.